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About Tully Falls

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Getting there and getting around

Tully Falls Road enters Tully Falls National Park 10km south of Ravenshoe. The road is sealed but narrow and winding in places. Caravans are not recommended.

There are two trailheads for the Wabunga Wayemba rainforest walking track on Tully Falls Road: the first is 11.5km from Ravenshoe and the second is a further 1.8km along.

Wheelchair accessibility

Tully Falls National Park has no wheelchair-accessible facilities.

Park features

Tully Falls National Park is part of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area and one of the wettest areas of Australia. The transition between vegetation types supports a wide range of animal life. Many of these animals—like golden bowerbirds and Lumholtz’s tree-kangaroos—are only found in the Wet Tropics. Walk through lush rainforest, sit beside tumbling waterfalls and rest beside clear mountain streams.

Camping and accommodation

Camping

Camping is only available in Tully Falls National Park along the Misty Mountains wilderness tracks.

Other accommodation

A range of accommodation—including hotels, motels, caravan parks, bed and breakfasts, and hostels—is provided on the Atherton and Evelyn tablelands. For more information, see the tourism information links.

Things to do

The first trail head on Wabunga Wayemba rainforest walking track. Photo: Tamara Vallance.

The first trail head on Wabunga Wayemba rainforest walking track. Photo: Tamara Vallance.

A steep side track leads to the falls. Photo: Tamara Vallance.

A steep side track leads to the falls. Photo: Tamara Vallance.

Walking

Wabunga Wayemba rainforest walking track (Grade: moderate)

Distance: full circuit 5.5km return (including side track to waterfall viewing platform)
Time: allow 2.5hrs walking time
Details: The track can be accessed from two trailheads on Tully Falls Road: the first is 11.5km from Ravenshoe and the second is a further 1.8km along. About halfway along the walking track (1.2km from either trailhead), a steep side track (690m return) leads from a shelter shed to a viewing platform overlooking a waterfall on Charmillin Creek, where clear mountain water cascades over moss-coated rocks into a shallow pool. This side track includes numerous stone steps that can become slippery in wet weather. Visitors who wish to walk the full track from one trailhead to the other should return via the same route—walking the 1.8km of Tully Falls Road between the trailheads is not recommended as it is narrow, winding and potentially dangerous for pedestrians.

Misty Mountains wilderness tracks

Some of the Misty Mountains wilderness tracks (a 130km network of short and long-distance tracks) are within Tully Falls National Park, offering visitors an opportunity to explore the less accessible parts of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area. Some tracks are suitable only for bushwalkers, while others are shared tracks with mountain biking permitted.

Trail-bike riding and four-wheel driving

Vehicles are only allowed on gazetted roads—they are not permitted off-road, including on walking tracks and boardwalks. Riders and drivers must be licensed and trail-bikes and vehicles must be registered. Expect to share the roads with pedestrians, cyclists and other vehicles.

There is a scenic road network suitable for four-wheel-drive vehicles nearby—see Misty Mountains wilderness tracks for more information.

For more information, see trail-bike riding and four-wheel driving.

Picnic and day-use areas

No day-use areas are provided in Tully Falls National Park. There is a day-use area further along Tully Falls Road at Tully Gorge lookout in Tully Gorge National Park.

Mountain biking

Unless otherwise indicated, bicycles are only allowed on gazetted roads—they are not generally permitted on Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service walking tracks. Expect to share the roads with pedestrians, motorbikes, vehicles and other cyclists.

Part of the Misty Mountains wilderness tracks network (a 130km network of short and long-distance tracks) is within Tully Falls National Park, offering visitors an opportunity to explore the less accessible parts of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area. Some tracks are suitable only for bushwalkers, while others are shared tracks with mountain biking permitted.  

For more information, see cycling.

Things to know before you go

Essentials to bring

To enjoy your visit to Tully Falls National Park remember to bring:

  • drinking water
  • basic first-aid kit
  • insect repellent and clothing to avoid insect bites
  • hat, sunscreen and sunglasses
  • wet weather clothing
  • sturdy, reliable footwear.

Opening hours

Tully Falls National Park is open 24 hours a day.

Permits and fees

Permits are required for commercial or organised group activities. Contact us for further information.

Pets

Domestic animals are not permitted in Tully Falls National Park.

Climate and weather

The harsh temperatures of the tropics are tempered by the elevation of the tableland. Winter nights can be very cool with frosts in open areas. Summer days can be hot but temperatures drop significantly in the evenings. Rainfall is seasonal, with most falling between December and April.

Fuel and supplies

Fuel and supplies are available at Ravenshoe. For more information, see the tourism information links.

Staying safe

Remain behind the railings at the viewing platform. Photo: Tamara Vallance.

Remain behind the railings at the viewing platform. Photo: Tamara Vallance.

  • Wear appropriate safety gear and be realistic about your walking abilities.
  • Beware of other park users. Vehicles, cyclists and pedestrians use the roads in this park.
  • Obey speed limits and safety and advisory signs.
  • Let a responsible person know your travel plans and when you expect to return.
  • The section of the Wabunga Wayema rainforest walking track that leads to the viewing platform is steep and slippery in sections, especially when wet. Remain behind the railings at the viewing platform.
  • Always leave walking plans with a responsible person and notify them on your return.
  • Remain behind the railings at the viewing deck and take care and around steep slopes.
  • Protect yourself from the sun. Wear sunscreen, a hat and a long-sleeved shirt, even on cloudy days.
  • Tully Falls National Park is in cassowary territory—be cass-o-wary.

For more information, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

Looking after the park

  • Stay on the formed roads—off-road trail-bike riding and four-wheel driving is not allowed. Mountain-bikes are not permitted on walking tracks or boardwalks unless specifically signposted.
  • Avoiding driving and riding on unsealed roads during and after heavy rains.
  • Wash vehicles and gear thoroughly before entering this park to prevent the spread of weeds and diseases.
  • Leave pets at home—domestic animals are prohibited.
  • Take your rubbish home with you—no bins are provided.

See the guidelines on caring for parks for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks.

Park management

Ravenshoe State Forest 1, gazetted on 23 June 1984, was converted to Tully Falls Forest Reserve on 14 September 2001. On 16 December 2005, it then changed to Tully Falls National Park.

Tully Falls National Park is managed by Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) in collaboration with the Wet Tropics Management Authority and the Traditional Owners. The park is part of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area.

Tourism information links

Ravenshoe Visitor Centre
www.trc.qld.gov.au
24 Moore Street, Ravenshoe QLD 4888
ph (07) 4097 7700
email

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see Queensland Holidays.

Further information

Contact us

Last updated
28 March 2017