Skip links and keyboard navigation

About Noosa

Park alerts

No current alerts for this park. See alerts for all parks.

Exciting news!
More park information is now available in our new trial Noosa National Park page. Please check it out and leave your feedback to help us improve your online experience.

Getting there and getting around

Find out about Noosa National Park by visiting the outdoor display in the Headland section day-use area. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

Find out about Noosa National Park by visiting the outdoor display in the Headland section day-use area. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

The Coastal Walk to Dolphin Point is a sealed, barrier free path. This image shows an uphill section of the walk close to Dolphin Point. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

The Coastal Walk to Dolphin Point is a sealed, barrier free path. This image shows an uphill section of the walk close to Dolphin Point. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

Noosa is 160km north of Brisbane via the Bruce Highway and the Sunshine Motorway.

Headland section

Arriving by car:

  • The main entrance car park is at the end of Park Road, Noosa Heads. This is a very popular and busy car park.
  • There is also access to the Headland section from Parkedge Road and the northern end of Sunshine Beach. There is limited parking.
  • Laguna Lookout is accessed from the end of Viewland Drive, in Noosa Heads. There is a small car park.

Walking from Hastings Street: 

  • Walk to Noosa National Park's main entrance along the seaside boardwalk (1km, 30mins), enjoying the ocean views.
  • Walk to Laguna Lookout from Hastings Street via the local council’s Yunaman Bushland Reserve walking track (2.4km return). Please note this track is very steep and there are many steps.

Bike access: 

  • Cycle with caution along Park Road.
  • Bike racks are provided in the day-use area (bring your own padlock, bikes are not permitted on tracks within the park).

Catch a bus and walk:

  • To the Park Road entrance (1km walk from Noosa Heads bus station platform 1, near Hastings Street)
  • To the Sunshine Beach Beach park entrance (1.3km walk from Duke Street, Ed Webb Park bus stop).

For bus timetables and fares visit Translink or phone 13 12 30.

Check the availability of free public buses over the busy Christmas and Easter holiday periods. They depart to and from Noosa Heads bus station platform 1 (near Hastings Street).

Peregian section

Access is from the eastern side of David Low Way, 3km north of Coolum Beach and 3km south of Peregian Beach.

Emu Mountain section

Access is located on the western side of David Low Way, 3.5km north of Coolum Beach and 2.5km south of Peregian Beach. Turn into Havana Road East for on-street parking.

East Weyba section

Access is from David Low Way, at Marcus Beach, 2.5km north of Peregian Beach. From David Low Way, turn into Podargus Parade and into Calliandra Grove or continue to the Hawthorn Grove access point.

Wheelchair accessibility

Some wheelchair accessible facilities are provided in Noosa Headland section including wheelchair accessible toilets and picnic tables at the day-use area and Tea Tree Bay.

The Coastal Walk from the day-use area features a section of sealed, barrier-free path. Choose activities that suit your capabilities:

  • The path is suitable for assisted-wheelchair access for 300m to Boiling Pot, with gradients up to 1:14 (4.1 degrees).
  • Beyond the Boiling Pot, the remainder of the sealed, barrier-free path leads to Dolphin Point (1.2km). Beware: this section has gradients which exceed 1:10 (5.7 degrees) for short sections—on average 1:7 (8 degrees) with a 10m section of 1:5 (11 degrees).

Park features

Granite Bay, Noosa National Park, Headland section. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

Granite Bay, Noosa National Park, Headland section. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

Some of South East Queensland's most picturesque coastline can be seen in Noosa National Park. The park includes the popular scenic headland at Noosa Heads, heath plains and high dunes around Lake Weyba (a large, shallow, saltwater lake in the Noosa River system), Emu Mountain and coastal lowlands extending south towards Coolum Beach.

The park is home to vulnerable and endangered wildlife such as the glossy black-cockatoo, ground parrot, koala, red goshawk, wallum froglet, swamp orchid and Christmas bells.

Open woodlands with a heath understorey and low wallum heath cover most of the park. Hoop and kauri pines tower above small rainforest pockets growing on sand in sheltered sites away from the sea breezes.

Camping and accommodation

Camping

To protect the natural values of this park, camping is not permitted.

Larger parks to the north, such as Cooloola Recreation Area, Great Sandy National Park and Burrum Coast National Park, are ideal for people seeking a coastal camping holiday.

Other accommodation

There is a wide range of holiday accommodation, including camping and caravan parks, in and around Noosa Heads, Peregian Beach and Coolum Beach. For more information see the tourism information links.

Things to do

View of Hells Gates, Coastal Walk. Photo: Trevor Hatfield, Queensland Government.

View of Hells Gates, Coastal Walk. Photo: Trevor Hatfield, Queensland Government.

Koalas are often seen in trees near the day-use area and along the walking tracks. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS Volunteer.

Koalas are often seen in trees near the day-use area and along the walking tracks. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS Volunteer.

Noosa Hill Walk. Photo Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

Noosa Hill Walk. Photo Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

Melaleuca woodland, sedgeland and low heath feature in Peregian section. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

Melaleuca woodland, sedgeland and low heath feature in Peregian section. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

Emu Mountain summit. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

Emu Mountain summit. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

Walking

Several easy to moderate walking tracks wind along the coast, through rainforest and open woodlands and across colourful wallum heath and sedgelands. Longer tracks lead out through open forest and heath, where a great variety of wildflowers can be observed in winter and spring.

Be prepared for your walk, especially in hot weather. Wear a hat and sunscreen, bring sufficient water, and allow adequate time to complete the walk. Suitable, sturdy footwear is recommended.

There have been serious assaults in this park. Never walk alone; always walk with a group or in sight of another group. Stay on marked walking tracks and walk in daylight hours only.

Bicycles, scooters, skateboards and rollerblades are not allowed on any of the tracks within the park. Bike racks are provided in the day-use area (bring your own padlock).

Key to track standards

Use the walking track grades listed with each walking track description to choose walks suitable for your group's abilities and fitness levels.

 Grade 1 track
  • No bushwalking experience required.
  • Flat, even surface with no steps or steep sections.
  • Suitable for wheelchairs with assistance.
 Grade 3 track
  • Suitable for most ages and fitness levels.
  • Tracks may have short steep hill sections and a rough surface.
 Grade 4 track
  • Bushwalking experience recommended.
  • Tracks may be long, rough, and very steep.

Walks in the Noosa Headland section

Explore over 15km of walking tracks marked with colour-coded directional signs. On hot summer days, the Tanglewood Walk and the Palm Grove Walk through rainforest, provide cool alternatives to the beach. The numbers in brackets before the walk name are map (PDF, 143K) references.

 (1) Palm Grove Walk

Distance: 1.1km return

Time: allow 15–30mins

Details: On a hot day, escape the sun for the densely-shaded rainforest on the Palm Grove Walk. Stroll along this short walk beneath the shade of elegant hoop pines and piccabeen palms.
This circuit starts from the day-use area, near the toilet block.

 (2) Tanglewood Walk

Distance: 8km return (Alternatively continue to Hell's Gates and return via the Coastal Walk for a 7.1km circuit)

Time: allow 2–3hrs

Details: This is one of the park's more isolated inland walks. The track passes through rainforest and tall eucalypt forest, then climbs a gentle rise into shrub and heath country. It is a great place to get away from the busy Coastal Walk, especially if you enjoy running. The Tanglewood Walk begins beside the day-use area toilet and meets the Coastal Walk just before it reaches Hell’s Gates.

 (3) Noosa Hill Walk

Distance: 2.8km return (Alternatively, return via a walking track link and the Tangelwood Walk, turning right at the junctions 3.7km circuit).

Time: allow 1–1.5hrs

Details: Climb to the crest of Noosa Hill, passing through shrublands dominated in places by she-oaks and grasstrees, and delicately-patterned scribbly gum forest. Views to the coast are restricted due to thick vegetation.
This track begins past the day-use area, just before the entrance to the Coastal Walk.

 (4) Coastal Walk

Distance: 10.8km return

Time: allow 4hrs

From the day-use area to Dolphin Point the path is sealed and barrier-free—gradients exceed 1:10 (5.7 degrees) for short sections beyond Boiling Pot.

    300m one way to Boiling Pot
  1.2km one way to Dolphin Point
2.7km one way to Hell's Gates
   3.3km one way to the northern end of Sunshine Beach
4.4km one way to southern end of Alexandria Bay
5.4km one way to Sunshine Beach


Caution: Take extra care near cliff edges and keep children under close supervision.

Details: Hugging close to the shoreline this walk takes in spectacular coastal scenery from the main park entrance to northern Sunshine Beach. It is the most popular walk in the park, be mindful that it can get very busy over weekends and holidays.

The first section of this walk features a sealed, barrier-free path to Dolphin Point, suitable for strollers. The path is suitable for assisted-wheelchair access for 300m to Boiling Pot, with gradients up to 1:14 (4.1 degrees). Beyond this, the 1.2km walk to Dolphin Point has gradients which exceed 1:10 (5.7 degrees) for short sections—on average 1:7 (8 degrees) with a 10m section of 1:5 (11 degrees).

Make your first stop at Boiling Pot, only a short distance along the walk. Situated atop a rocky outcrop, this lookout offers sweeping views north to the high coastal dunes of Cooloola section in Great Sandy National Park, and over a small beach known as Tea Tree Bay, popular with surfers. Do a bit of koala spotting as you continue on to Tea Tree Bay. There are toilets at the far end of this bay.

Journey on to Dolphin Point, boasting views of Granite Bay and neighbouring Winch and Picnic Cove. As the name suggests, stand at the point and see if you can spot a pod of passing dolphins. Turn around here to remain on the sealed path, or continue on an uneven, gravel and sand track leading to Hell’s Gates.

Once you reach Hell’s Gates you will be greeted with incredible coastal views unlike anything you’ve seen before.

Walk along the beach at Alexandria Bay and rejoin the formed walking track at the southern end of the beach. There is a very steep set of stairs leading down to Sunshine Beach.

It is possible to catch a bus and walk outside the park between the Park Road entrance (1.2km walk to closest bus stop Noosa Heads station platform 1) and the Sunshine Beach park entrance (1.3km walk to Duke Street, Ed Webb Park bus stop). Bus timetables and fares are available at Translink.

 (5) Alexandria Bay Walk

Distance: 4.2km return

Time: allow 1hr

Details: Take a coastal walk from the southern edge of the park's Headland section, through picturesque eucalypt forest and sun-dappled heathland. Arrive at Alexandria Bay, with its sweeping beaches and surrounding rocky headland begging to be explored.

This walk begins from the Parkedge Road entrance. You can also access this track via walking track links:

  • 370m one way to McAnally Drive
  • 730m one way toTanglewood Walk

Walks in the Peregian section

 Ocean Beach Walk

Distance: 1km return

Time: allow 30mins

Details: This short walk to the beach leads across a boardwalk through paperbark swamp and sedgelands and down a sandy track to heathland and she-oak forests. Discover colourful wildflowers and dune plants such as dune bean and pigface.

Walks in the Emu Mountain section

 Emu Mountain Summit Walk

Distance: 1.1km return

Time: allow 45mins–1hr

Details: Take a short, invigorating walk up Emu Mountain Summit Walk (71m) to witness 360 degree panoramic views. The track is steep in places and can be slippery when damp, so take care where you step. In spring, the montane heath boasts a colourful array of wildflowers. Several threatened plants also grow here and are considered local treasures. Keen botanists can look for Bancroft’s red gum and the largest population of Emu Mountain she-oak Allocasuarina emuina.

 Hakea Walk

Distance: 2.4km return

Time: allow 1hr

Details: Hakea shrubs, with distinctive woody seed pods, are common along this walk. Early morning and dusk provide wonderful opportunities for birdwatching, but be safe and never walk alone.

Walks in the East Weyba section

There are no formal walking tracks in the East Weyba section, but there are several kilometres of fire management tracks. Please walk only on the fire management tracks, do not walk off-track at any time as unexploded ammunition can be found in this area. During World War II, this area was a military training ground. The diverse heaths exhibit a kaleidoscope of colour in late winter and spring. This is a great spot for birdwatching so bring your binoculars.

Picnic and day-use areas

Have a picnic overlooking beautiful Laguna Bay with its sweeping views from Noosa to Cooloola. The day-use area is located at the end of Park Road, in Noosa Headland section. Picnic tables, electric barbecues, drinking water and public toilets are provided. An outdoor information display tells stories about the parks features, values and cultural heritage.

Toilets and tap water are provided near Tea Tree Bay.

Viewing wildlife

Lace monitors, honeyeaters and koalas may be seen while you are walking on Noosa's tracks or in the day-use area. Early mornings and dusk provide good opportunities for birdwatching and wildlife observation.

Between June and November, humpback whales can be glimpsed as they cruise past the coastline on their way to and from northern breeding grounds. The best spots to watch the whales are Dolphin Point and Hell's Gates. Turtles and dolphins are often seen from these points.

Swimming

Be aware that beaches surrounding Noosa National Park are not patrolled by surf lifesavers and swimming is not recommended.

Strong currents and surf are particularly dangerous at Alexandria Bay.

It is recommended that you only swim at patrolled beaches at Noosa Heads and Sunshine Beach.

Things to know before you go

Essentials to bring

  • Bring adequate drinking water, a first-aid kit, insect repellent and a mobile phone.
  • For walking, wear suitable shoes, sunscreen, a hat and long-sleeved shirt.
  • Bring a camera and binoculars for viewing wildlife.

Opening hours

For your safety, walk in Noosa National Park in daylight hours only (see staying safe).

Overnight stays or camping is not permitted.

Permits and fees

Large groups and commercial users may need to obtain an organised event or commercial activity permit.

Pets

Domestic animals are not permitted in Noosa National Park.

Climate and weather

Noosa Heads has a mild, subtropical climate. The average daily temperature range is 21–29°C in summer and 10–21°C in winter. For more information see the tourism information links.

Fuel and supplies

Fuel and supplies are available in Noosa Heads and nearby towns. For more information see the tourism information links.

Staying safe

  • Never walk alone; always walk with a group or in sight of another group. Stay on marked walking tracks and walk in daylight hours only. There have been serious assaults in this park.
  • Be prepared for your walk, especially in hot weather. Wear a hat and sunscreen, carry sufficient water, and allow adequate time to complete the walk in daylight hours. Suitable sturdy footwear is recommended.
  • Be aware that beaches surrounding Noosa National Park are not patrolled by surf lifesavers. Swimming here is not recommended.
  • Stay away from cliff edges and supervise children at all times.
  • Ensure that you lock your vehicle and remove all valuables, including garage remote controls. Do not leave valuables unattended.
  • Carry a mobile phone. Be aware that mobile phone reception is not reliable in all areas of the park, including parts of the Headland section. Mobile phone reception is generally available at Emu Mountain and Peregian sections.
  • Be aware that mobile phone reception is not reliable in all areas of the park.
  • Emergency radios are located on the Coastal Walk at the northern entrance to Alexandria Bay and on the Alexandria Bay Walk where it accesses the beach.
  • Please report details of unusual activity or illegal camp sites to the police.

Consider Others

Noosa is a busy place, in excess of 1.5 million visitors annually! Make your visit enjoyable for you and other visitors.

  • Everyone moves at a different pace—give elderly, disabled and young people greater space.
  • Be careful to avoid collisions—especially when carrying larger gear or moving quickly; carry surfboards with fins turned in; slow down for narrow sections; alert other before passing.
  • Remember that walkers have right of way on walking tracks.
  • Never take bicycles, scooters, skateboards and rollerblades on park walking tracks. They are not permitted here. Bike racks are provided in the day-use area (bring your own padlock).

For more information, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

Looking after the park

Many species depend on Noosa National Park for food, shelter and survival. Help protect their habitat by being a minimal impact visitor. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS Volunteer.

Many species depend on Noosa National Park for food, shelter and survival. Help protect their habitat by being a minimal impact visitor. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS Volunteer.

You can help protect the park by following these guidelines.

  • Leave your pets at home; they are prohibited in the national park. Pets can frighten or kill wildlife, annoy other visitors or become lost.
  • Do not feed or leave food for animals. Human food can harm wildlife and cause some animals to become aggressive.
  • Everything within the national park is protected. Do not take or interfere with plants or animals.
  • Take your rubbish out of the park for appropriate disposal.
  • Stay on tracks. Do not cut corners or create new tracks, as this causes erosion.
  • Keep out of the fenced dune area behind Alexandria Bay, as this area erodes easily.

See the guidelines on caring for parks for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks.

Park management

Originally declared in 1939, Noosa National Park covers approximately 3,000ha and includes areas surrounding Lake Weyba, Emu Mountain, Peregian Beach and Coolum Beach. As the coast becomes more developed, this park is becoming increasingly important for nature conservation and protects a significant number of threatened species.

A management plan (PDF, 299K) for Noosa National Park guides the management of the area.

Tourism information links

Noosa National Park Information Centre

Managed by the Noosa Parks Association
Located within Noosa National Park beside the Park Road entrance car park.
Open from 9.15am to 4.45pm, seven days a week.
ph (07) 5447 3522

Visit Noosa information centres

www.visitnoosa.com.au
ph (07) 5430 5000 or 1300 066 672
email

Visit Noosa manages accredited Visitor Information Centres in the Noosa area that provide a range of local and regional tourist brochures and information, as well as a tour, attraction and accommodation booking service.

  • Noosa Visitor Information Centre, 61 Hastings Street (opposite the roundabout), Noosa Heads Qld 4567
  • Noosa Marina Information Centre, 2 Parkyn Court, Noosa Marina, Tewantin, Noosa Heads QLD 4567
  • Parkyn's Hut Information Centre, Poinciana Ave, Tewantin Qld 4565

Visit Sunshine Coast information centres

www.visitsunshinecoast.com
ph 1300 847 481 (within Australia)
email

Visit Sunshine Coast manages accredited Visitor Information Centres across the Sunshine Coast that provide a range of local and regional tourist brochures and information, as well as a tour, attraction and accommodation booking service.

  • Bulcock Street Visitor Information Centre, 77 Bulcock Street, Caloundra.
  • Caloundra Road Visitor Information Centre, 7 Caloundra Road, Caloundra.
  • Coolum Visitor Information Centre, Tickle Park, David Low Way, Coolum Beach.
  • Glass House Mountains Visitor and Interpretive Centre, Bruce Parade, corner of Reed Street, Settler's Rotary Park, Glass House Mountains.
  • Maroochydore Visitor Information Centre, Melrose Parade, corner of Sixth Avenue, Maroochydore.
  • Montville Visitor Information Centre, 198 Main Street, Montville.
  • Mooloolaba Visitor Information Centre, Brisbane Road, corner of First Avenue, Mooloolaba.
  • Sunshine Coast Airport Visitor Information Centre, Friendship Drive, Mudjimba.

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see Queensland Holidays.

Further information

Contact us

Last updated
12 October 2017