Skip links and keyboard navigation

About Murray Falls

Park alerts

No current alerts for this park. See alerts for all parks.

Getting there and getting around

From Tully, travel south along the Bruce Highway for 16km and turn off at Murrigal. Continue for 20km to Murray Falls. Alternatively, travel 21km north from Cardwell to Bilyana and turn west for 20km. Follow the signposts. Access roads are partly sealed and suitable for conventional vehicles.

Access to the falls, beyond the river boardwalk, is not permitted. Slippery rocks make it dangerous and serious injuries and deaths have occurred. Observe the signposted restricted access area. (PDF, 187K)

Contact the Rainforest and Reef Information Centre in Cardwell to enquire about local road conditions.

Wheelchair accessibility

The camping area has wheelchair-accessible toilets and the first 75m of the river boardwalk is wheelchair accessible.

Park features

Murray Falls, Girrramay National Park is in the foothills of the Kirrama Range and is part of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area. Murray Falls is one of the prettiest waterfalls in north Queensland, with spectacular water-sculpted rocks and crystal clear pools.

The day-use area is a great location for a picnic. The falls can be viewed from the boardwalk and viewing platform. For the more adventurous, a walking track through the rainforest will take you to a lookout, with views of the falls and the Murray Valley.

Read more about the nature, culture and history of Murray Falls, Girramay National Park.

Camping and accommodation

Camping

Camping is permitted at Murray Falls, Girramay National Park. Permits are required and fees apply. A tag with your booking number must be displayed at your camp site. Camping permits should be booked in advance.

Other accommodation

There is a range of holiday accommodation in and around the townships of Tully and Cardwell, including caravan parks, motels, holiday units, cabins and hostels and. For more information see the tourism information links below.

Things to do

Walking

Murray Falls camping area map (PDF, 140K)

Two walking tracks will help you to explore Murray Falls, Girramay National Park.

River boardwalk—300m return (10mins) Grade: easy

Take a pleasant walk along the boardwalk for views of the falls. The river boardwalk begins at the top end of the camping area and provides a safe way to view Murray Falls from several angles. The first 75 metres of the boardwalk is wheelchair accessible.

Yalgay Ginja Bulumi walk—1.8km return (allow 1.5 hrs) Grade: moderate

Walk through the open forest and rainforest to the lookout for a view over the falls. Learn about the culture of the Girramay people from signs along the track.

Picnic and day-use areas

Tables are provided for picnickers in the day-use area. Toilets are provided at the camping area. A short path links the day-use area to the camping area.

Fishing

Fishing is not permitted at Murray Falls, Girramay National Park.

Viewing wildlife

Murray Falls, Girramay National Park offers excellent opportunities for viewing wildlife. See wallabies, possums and a variety of reptiles. Bring binoculars and watch for many colourful birds including fruit doves, sulphur-crested cockatoos, rainbow lorikeets, honeyeaters, kookaburras and forest kingfishers.

During the day, look for the endangered sharp-snouted dayfrog as it basks in the sun by the river and listen for its high-pitched call. Also listen for the rasping call of the endangered mountain mistfrog.

Spring is a great time to enjoy colourful wildflower displays.

See the description of the park's natural environment for more details about Murray Fall's diverse wildlife.

Other things to do

In the day-use area there are a number of access points to the Murray River. The water is often fast flowing and the rocks slippery.

Access to the river upstream of the day-use area is not permitted. Slippery rocks make it dangerous and serious injuries have occurred. Observe the signposted restricted access area. (PDF, 187K)

Things to know before you go

Essentials to bring

  • drinking water
  • gas or liquid fuel stove with spare fuel
  • cooking utensils and equipment
  • basic first-aid kit
  • insect repellent and clothing to protect against insect bites
  • hat, sunscreen and sunglasses
  • sturdy, reliable footwear
  • strong rubbish bags
  • firewood.

Opening hours

Murray Falls, Girramay National Park is open 24 hours a day.

Permits and fees

Camping permits are required and fees apply. A camping tag with you booking number must be displayed at your campsite.

Permits are required for all commercial activities or group functions within the park.

Pets

Domestic animals are not permitted at Murray Falls, Girramay National Park.

Climate and weather

In summer, daytime temperatures at Murray Falls, Girramay National Park can exceed 40 degrees Celsius. The cooler months, from April to September, are the best times to visit. For more information see the tourism information links below. Weather forecasts are available from the Bureau of Meteorology.

Fuel and supplies

Fuel and supplies are available at Cardwell and Tully. For more information see the tourism information links below.

Staying safe

  • Access to the falls, beyond the river boardwalk, is not permitted. Observe the signposted restricted access area (PDF, 187K).
  • Take care around cliffs, steep slopes and rock faces along tracks and at lookouts.
  • Stay on the track and take care on uneven surfaces, especially in wet conditions.
  • Supervise children closely.
  • Never jump or dive into the water.
  • Take care when walking near the creek—the rocks can be slippery.
  • Protect yourself from the sun. Wear sunscreen, a hat and a long sleeved shirt, even on cloudy days.
  • Bullrouts (freshwater stonefish) live in the river. Wear shoes when wading or swimming. If stung, seek medical attention.
  • Murray Falls is in cassowary territory. Remember to always be Cass-O-Wary.

For more information, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

Looking after the park

  • Camp only in the designated camping area.
  • Use toilets provided.
  • Do not chase, scare or feed animals.
  • Leave pets at home—domestic animals are not allowed.
  • Use rubbish bins provided.
  • Light campfires responsibly using the fire rings provided and do not collect firewood within the park. Fuel stoves are recommended. Obey fire restrictions.
  • Everything in the park, living or dead, is protected. Please leave everything as you found it.

See the guidelines on caring for parks for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks.

Park management

Murray Falls, Girramay National Park is part of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area and is managed to preserve the area's natural, cultural and scenic values while providing nature-based recreational opportunities for visitors.

Girramay National Park was gazetted on 20 July 2007. Murray Upper National Park became part of Girramay National Park on 5 June 2009. This followed the signing of a memorandum of understanding between the department and the Girramay Aboriginal people.

Girramay National Park is managed by Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) in collaboration with the Wet Tropics Management Authority and the Girramay Aboriginal people.

Tourism information links

Townsville Bulletin Square Visitor Information Centre
www.townsvillenorthqueensland.com.au 
334A Flinders Street, Townsville QLD 4810
ph (07) 4726 2700 
email

Rainforest and Reef Information Centre
www.greatgreenwaytourism.com 
142 Victoria Street, Cardwell QLD 4849
ph (07) 4066 8601
email
Managed by Great Green Way Tourism Incorporated.

Tully Visitor and Heritage Centre
www.tropicalcoasttourism.com.au
Bruce Highway, Tully QLD 4854
ph (07) 4068 2288
email

Tyto Information and Wetlands Centre
www.tyto.com.au
Bruce Highway, Ingham QLD 4850
ph (07) 4776 4792
email

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see www.queenslandholidays.com.au

Further information

Contact us

Last updated
2 May 2017