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About Mapleton National Park

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Getting there and getting around

Point Glorious Road. Mapleton National Park. Always drive cautiously on forest roads. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Point Glorious Road. Mapleton National Park. Always drive cautiously on forest roads. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Mapleton Forest Drive has been damaged over an extended period of severe wet weather conditions. Photo: Queensland Government.

Mapleton Forest Drive has been damaged over an extended period of severe wet weather conditions. Photo: Queensland Government.

Access to Gheerulla camping area is four-wheel-drive only in dry conditions. Photo: Mark Lythall, Queensland Government

Access to Gheerulla camping area is four-wheel-drive only in dry conditions. Photo: Mark Lythall, Queensland Government

Flood waters in this area rise and fall quickly and are a hazard to life and property. Plan to visit the park in dry weather. Photo: Queensland Government.

Flood waters in this area rise and fall quickly and are a hazard to life and property. Plan to visit the park in dry weather. Photo: Queensland Government.

From Brisbane, travel 105km north along the Bruce Highway to Nambour, then travel 11km west to Mapleton.

Roads in Mapleton National Park are unsealed. As a result of flood damage, most roads require four-wheel-drive vehicles for safe access and visiting in dry weather conditions is recommended.

Conventional vehicle accessible areas

Delicia Road is an all weather road accessible by conventional vehicles and provides access to a Sunshine Coast Hinterland Great Walk entrance point and short walks.

The Mapleton day-use area and southern entrance to the Gheerulla Trail Bike Area is accessible by conventional vehicles in dry conditions only, via Delicia Road and a short section of Mapleton Forest Drive. This road becomes very slippery in wet conditions.

Four-wheel-drive accessible areas

Point Glorious day-use area is accessible by four-wheel-drive vehicle in dry conditions. From Mapleton township travel north on Mapleton Forest Drive, Buckby Road and Point Glorious Road. Alternatively, travel west from Yandina via Cooloolabin, Buckby and Point Glorious Roads.

To reach the Gheerulla camping area and northern access to the trail bike area from Mapleton, continue through Mapleton on Obi Obi Road for 19km and turn right into the Eumundi–Kenilworth Road. After 5km turn right into Sam Kelly Road. The camping area is 2km down the road.

To reach the Gheerulla camping area and trail bike area from the north, take the Eumundi–Kenilworth Road turnoff from the Bruce Highway and travel 24km, turn left into Sam Kelly Road and continue 2km to the camping area.

Roads may be closed due to weather conditions, road maintenance or high fire danger. For your safety, do not enter the park when closure signs are displayed.

Forest roads—expect the unexpected!

Unsealed forest roads can be steep and winding:

  • Slow down. Allow time to react to unexpected situations and changed conditions. You may encounter other drivers, cyclists, walkers, horse riders, cattle and wildlife.
  • Be courteous. Pull over to the left to allow vehicles to pass. Do not stop in the middle of the roadway—for photography and enjoying the scenery. Find a safe place to pull over or turn around.
  • Watch out for corners and steep slopes. Drive carefully around corners, especially after rain. Stay on your side of the road and avoid sudden slowing. Shift down a gear when roads are steep.
  • All road rules apply. Obey speed limits. Always wear a seat belt. Never carry passengers outside the vehicle cabin.
  • Avoid using forest roads during and immediately after wet weather to reduce damage to road surfaces and for your own safety. Do not attempt to cross flooded creeks.

Warning! Heavy rain can flood creek crossings and cause wash outs on forest roads.

For your safety please observe the following:

  • Obey all road closures—roads may be closed due to deep water levels at creek crossings or wet and slippery conditions.
  • Flood waters in this area rise and fall quickly and are a hazard to life and property.
  • Avoid flooded crossings. Submerged obstacles may pose a hazard. Traffic ahead may have created hidden hazards, such as deep holes.

Before you visit, check current conditions:

Wheelchair accessibility

There are no wheelchair-accessible tracks or facilities in Mapleton National Park. Nearby, Mapleton Falls National Park has a wheelchair-accessible lookout with views of the waterfall and rainforest valley below.

Park features

In the Sunshine Coast hinterland, Mapleton National Park protects diverse forest types and offers a range of recreational opportunities including sections of the 58km Sunshine Coast Hinterland Great Walk, a scenic forest drive and a popular trail bike area.

Camping and accommodation

Gheerulla Creek flows beside the small camping area. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Gheerulla Creek flows beside the small camping area. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Camping

Mapleton National Park has a small camping area at Gheerulla Creek beside the entrance to the Gheerulla Trail Bike area.

Gheerulla camping area is close to the creek and provides three camping sites, picnic tables, toilets and barbecues. This small camping area is not suitable for caravans.

If you plan to use the barbecues, bring your own milled firewood, as it is illegal to collect wood from the forest. Preferably bring and use a fuel stove.

Camping permits are required and fees apply.

For walkers on the 58km Sunshine Coast Hinterland Great Walk, there are walkers' camps at Thilba Thalba and Ubajee in Mapleton National Park. Please see the Sunshine Coast Hinterland Great Walk for more information.

Other accommodation

There is a wide range of holiday accommodation in and around Montville, Mapleton, Maleny and other towns in the Sunshine Coast hinterland. For more information see the tourism information links below.

Things to do

Lush forest on the Linda Garrett circuit, Mapleton National Park. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Lush forest on the Linda Garrett circuit, Mapleton National Park. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Piluaris walk is an easy forest walk with a beautiful fern understorey. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Piluaris walk is an easy forest walk with a beautiful fern understorey. Photo: Ross Naumann.

View from lookout platform at Point Glorious day-use area, Mapleton National Park. Photo: Ross Naumann.

View from lookout platform at Point Glorious day-use area, Mapleton National Park. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Scribbly gums and grass trees grow at Point Glorious day-use area. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Scribbly gums and grass trees grow at Point Glorious day-use area. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Licensed riders using registered motorcycles can ride through bushland on the Gheerulla Trail Bike Area trails. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Licensed riders using registered motorcycles can ride through bushland on the Gheerulla Trail Bike Area trails. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Walking

Several short walking tracks are provided in Mapleton National Park.

The Sunshine Coast Hinterland Great Walk, a 58km Class 4 walking track with overnight campsites, passes through Mapleton National Park. Walkers can also take shorter day walks along this great walk.

There are also other short walk opportunities nearby in Mapleton Falls National Park and Kondalilla National Park.

Key to track standards

Use the walking track grade listed with each walking track description to choose walks suitable for your group’s abilities and fitness levels.

Walking track grades

Class 2 track Australian Standards

  • Easy level, well-graded track, suitable for all fitness levels.

Class 3 track Australian Standards

  • Gently sloping, well-defined track with slight inclines or few steps.
  • Caution needed on loose gravel surfaces and exposed natural lookouts.
  • Reasonable level of fitness and ankle-supporting footwear required.

Class 4 track Australian Standards

  • Distinct track, usually with steep exposed inclines or many steps.
  • Caution needed on loose gravel surfaces and exposed natural outlooks.
  • Moderate level of fitness and ankle-supporting footwear required.

Walking tracks

Linda Garrett circuit (Class 2)

Distance: 700m return

Time: allow 20 minutes

Details: This circuit leads through rainforest, a palm grove and tall wet eucalypt forest dominated by blackbutt, turpentine, brush box and flooded gum.

Pilularis forest walk (Class 2)

Distance: 800m

Time: allow 20 minutes

Details: This walk leads through tall open forest with an understorey of ferns and rainforest shrubs.

Bonyee walk (Class 3)

Distance: 400m

Time: allow 10 minutes

Details: This track is named using local Gubbi Gubbi language for bunya. The walk features a very large bunya pine, rainforest and a piccabeen palm grove.

Picnic and day-use areas

Two picnic and day-use areas are provided in Mapleton National Park—Mapleton day-use area and Point Glorious day-use area.

Mapleton day-use area

Located in tall blackbutt forest (Eucalyptus pilularis) and on the site of an old forest station. Picnic tables, toilets and barbecues are provided. If you plan to use the barbecues, bring your own milled firewood, as it is illegal to collect wood from the forest. Preferably bring and use a fuel stove.

Point Glorious day-use area

Point Glorious, approximately 400 m above sea level, provides spectacular views of the coast and hinterland. Scribbly gums and grass trees grow around the lookout. Abseiling enthusiasts can apply their skills on the rhyolite bluffs at Point Glorious.

Driving

The Mapleton Forest Drive starts just north of Mapleton and leads to spectacular views of the coast and hinterland from Point Glorious. Scribbly gums and grass trees grow around the lookout. This forest road is suitable for four-wheel-drive vehicles. It is unsealed and varies in condition depending on weather impacts and maintenance.

Forest roads—expect the unexpected!

Unsealed forest roads can be steep and winding.

  • Slow down. Allow time to react to unexpected situations and changed conditions. You may encounter other drivers, cyclists, walkers, horse riders, cattle and wildlife.
  • Be courteous. Pull over to the left to allow vehicles to pass. Do not stop in the middle of the roadway—for photography and enjoying the scenery. Find a safe place to pull over or turn around.
  • Watch out for corners and steep slopes. Drive carefully around corners, especially after rain. Stay on your side of the road and avoid sudden slowing. Shift down a gear when roads are steep.
  • All road rules apply. Obey speed limits. Always wear a seat belt. Never carry passengers outside the vehicle cabin.
  • Avoid using forest roads during and immediately after wet weather to reduce damage to road surfaces and for your own safety. Do not attempt to cross flooded creeks.

Trail bike riding

At Gheerulla trail bike area, about 26km of trail bike circuits and limited camping facilities are provided for licensed riders using registered motorcycles. A special permit is not required.

Ride responsibly

  • Stay on the defined trail bike tracks.
  • Observe and obey safety and advisory signs.
  • Always expect to find someone or something on the track around the next corner. You may encounter other riders, wildlife, cattle and natural obstacles such as fallen trees and water-eroded tracks.
  • Ride cautiously on the two-way trail sections.
  • Avoid spinning your rear tyre excessively as this leads to erosion problems. Ride sensibly so this recreational facility can be available for future use.

Follow the link for more information on other trail bike riding opportunities.

Horse riding

Nature-based recreation opportunities are available for horse riders and mountain bike riders on designated tracks only.

Horse riding is permitted on the Horse Trail Network only. Horses are not permitted in the camping areas. A horse float parking area is provided on the Cooloolabin Road approximately 6 km west of Yandina.

Mountain bike riding is permitted in the same areas and on vehicle tracks unless otherwise signed.

Horses and bikes are not permitted on designated walking tracks.

A special permit is not required unless it is a commercial activity, an organised event activity or a competitive event. Contact us for further information.

Read and view maps about the horse trail networks in this region.

Abseiling and rope sports

At Point Glorious, abseiling and rock climbing enthusiasts can apply their skills on the rhyolite bluffs. NPSR approved anchor points are provided near the lookout. Do not interfere with fixed equipment on the cliff or anchor to trees or the lookout platform.

For your safety:

  • Assess the site for hazards and suitability for your experience and skill level.
  • Check weather conditions and wear appropriate clothing.
  • Use anchor points provided. Do not interfere with fixed equipment on the cliff or anchor to trees.
  • Wear a helmet, harness and footwear and use ropes and protective equipment (karabiners, slings and chocks) designed for abseiling and follow manufacturer's specifications.
  • Carry emergency communication equipment and a first-aid kit. Tell a responsible person where and when you plan to abseil.
  • Never abseil under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
  • Minimise vegetation disturbance to protect the area from erosion and the introduction of pest plant species.

Things to know before you go

Essentials to bring

  • Bring insect repellent to discourage mosquitoes, leeches and ticks.
  • Bring your own drinking water—this is not provided. Creek water is unsuitable for drinking as it may contain organisms that can cause illness.
  • Wear sturdy shoes, a hat, protective clothing and sunscreen.
  • No bins are provided. Bring rubbish bags to remove your rubbish and recyclables from the park.

Opening hours

The forest is open 24 hours a day, but for your safety, walk and ride in daylight hours only.

Permits and fees

Camping permits are required and fees apply.

Follow this link for Sunshine Coast Hinterland Great Walk walker's camps.

Climate and weather

Local temperatures can rise above 30 degrees Celsius in summer and drop to freezing point overnight in winter. Nights can be cool at any time of the year.

Always check weather conditions before your visit. Be aware that forest areas are hazardous during strong winds, as tree branches may fall.

During severe wet weather, which occurs mostly in spring and summer, some tracks flood and are closed for public safety. Check park alerts for current warnings or park closures.

For more information see the Bureau of Meteorology website and tourism information links below.

Fuel and supplies

Fuel and supplies are available in Mapleton and other nearby towns. For more information see the tourism information links below.

Staying safe

  • Sheer cliffs and slippery rocks can be hazardous. Always supervise children, keep to the walking tracks, stay behind safety fences and follow all warning signs to avoid tragedy.
  • Stay on track. Tell a responsible person where you are going and when you should return. Wear sturdy shoes. Carry adequate clothing, water and snack food.
  • Supervise children. Natural areas have hazards that children are unfamiliar with, including creeks, cliff edges, stinging plants and wildlife.
  • Water hazards—never dive into creeks or rock pools. They contain submerged rocks and logs. Water depth is variable and unpredictable. Rock surfaces can be slippery.
  • Carry a first-aid kit—and know how to use it. Use repellent on exposed skin and shoes to discourage mosquitoes, leeches and ticks. Remove ticks immediately.
  • Carry fresh water. Drinking water is not provided. Creek water is unsuitable for drinking as it may contain organisms that can cause illness.
  • Human food is not for wildlife—it can cause overpopulation, illness and aggressive behaviour.
  • Check park alerts for current warnings or closures. Closures can occur during severe wet weather, during high winds and for fire management. For your safety, do not enter the park when closure signs are displayed.
  • Do not attempt to cross flooded creeks. If you are caught out on the tracks when creek crossings flood, wait until the water no longer covers the track. Water rises and falls in a short period of time.
  • For all emergencies call 000. Mobile phone reception is poor in these areas. If you have difficulty connecting to 000 from your mobile phone, try dialling 112.

For more information about staying safe while visiting national parks, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

Looking after the park

Help protect natural resources by being a minimal impact visitor.

  • Take all your rubbish out of the park. Remove excess food packaging at home before your visit to the forest, and pack strong sealable bags or containers to store food and rubbish.
  • Keep creeks clean—they provide valuable habitat for wildlife including rare frogs.
  • Leave your domestic animals at home. They are not allowed in Mapleton National Park. Domestic animals can distress or kill native animals that live here.

See the guidelines on caring for parks and forests for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks.

Park management

Mapleton National Park is part of a network of parks and forests that protect the Blackall Range's remnant forest communities, provide essential wildlife habitat and scenic places for nature-based recreation.

Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) is responsible for managing Mapleton National Park under the Nature Conservation Act 1992. A special management area (controlled action) has been declared over parts of Mapleton National Park to allow for the continuation of foliage harvesting activities until 2024. These areas are carefully monitored to ensure the maintenance of natural and cultural values.

See natural environment, culture and history for more information about the history and values of Mapleton National Park.

Tourism information links

Visit Sunshine Coast
www.visitsunshinecoast.com
ph 1300 847 481 (within Australia)
email

Visit Sunshine Coast manages accredited Visitor Information Centres across the Sunshine Coast that provide a range of local and regional tourist brochures and information, as well as a tour, attraction and accommodation booking service.

  • 198 Main Road, Montville
  • Settler's Rotary Park, Bruce Parade, corner of Reed Street, Glass House Mountains
  • 7 Caloundra Road, Caloundra
  • 77 Bulcock Street, Caloundra
  • Cnr Melrose Parade and Sixth Avenue, Cotton Tree (Maroochydore)
  • Cnr First Ave and Brisbane Rd, Mooloolaba
  • Tickle Park, David Low Way, Coolum Beach
  • Arrivals Terminal, Sunshine Coast Airport, Friendship Drive, Mudjimba

Maleny Visitor Information Centre
www.hinterlandtourism.com.au
Maple St
Maleny Qld 4552
ph (07) 5499 9033
fax (07) 5499 9033
email

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see Queensland Holidays.

Further information

Contact us

Last updated
28 October 2016