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About Jimna

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Getting there and getting around

The access road to Peach Trees camping area, Jimna State Forest. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

The access road to Peach Trees camping area, Jimna State Forest. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

From Brisbane travel north to Caboolture and take the D’Aguilar Highway turn-off to Kilcoy. From Kilcoy, travel north 45km along the Kilcoy–Murgon Road to Jimna State Forest. The access road to the camping and day-use area includes a concrete causeway creek crossing. Heavy rain can cause flooding on this bridge—sometimes suddenly. Avoid flooded crossings and take care when driving on forest roads.

Wheelchair accessibility

There are two wheelchair-accessible toilets at Peach Trees camping area (northern and southern toilet blocks). Disabled parking is available adjacent to both toilet blocks.

There is a wheelchair friendly camp site located in Peach Trees camp site. See Camping in Jimna State Forest for more details.

Park features

Eastern grey kangaroos are frequently seen around Yabba Creek, Jimna State Forest. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

Eastern grey kangaroos are frequently seen around Yabba Creek, Jimna State Forest. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

Jimna State Forest’s landscape is a rich green mosaic of sustainable pine forest plantations and contrasting native forests.

The area has a colourful history of goldmining, with all the 'gold rush' fever that entailed. The last flurry of mining activity in the 1940s yielded 2.8kg of gold.

Jimna township developed largely around the timber industry. Steam-driven sawmills processed timber at Jimna and nearby Sunday Creek.

Yabba Creek is a great place for birdwatching, exploring the creek and discovering its aquatic wildlife. Watch the water quietly around dusk and dawn to spot platypus.

During the day eastern grey kangaroos and lace monitors are often seen in the camping area. After dark possums are active in the trees as they forage for food.

Camping and accommodation

Camping

Peach Trees camping area

Peach Trees camping area is 45km north-west of Kilcoy along the Kilcoy–Murgon Road.

Camp on the lush grass beside Yabba Creek, in an area suitable for tents, caravans, campervans and larger groups. Facilities include: fire rings (bring your own clean, untreated firewood such as mill off-cuts), tap water (unsuitable for drinking without treatment as it is pumped from the creek and bore and may contain organisms that can cause illness), wheelchair-accessible toilets and QldParks-Wifi.

Peach Trees Wheelchair Friendly camp site, within the main camping area, is specifically designed for people with a wheelchair. A disabled sticker must be displayed on the vehicle windscreen.

Camping permits must be booked in advance, online or by phone.

Other accommodation

A range of holiday accommodation is available in the Sunshine Coast hinterland. For more information, see the tourism information links below.

Things to do

A good platypus viewpoint along Yabba Creek circuit. Photo: Queensland Government.

A good platypus viewpoint along Yabba Creek circuit. Photo: Queensland Government.

Eugenia circuit winds through open forest. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

Eugenia circuit winds through open forest. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

Two Araucaria (L. bunya pine, R. hoop pine) emerge from the dry rainforest. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

Two Araucaria (L. bunya pine, R. hoop pine) emerge from the dry rainforest. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

Nature-based recreation opportunities are available in this area for walkers, horse riders and mountain bike riders.

Walking

The classification system is based on Australian standards. Use the walking track grade listed with each walking track description to choose walks suitable for your ability and fitness level. Please note that while each track is classified according to its most difficult section, other sections may be of an easier level.

Key to track standards

Class 2 walking trackGrade 2 track Australian Standards
  • Formed track.
  • May have gentle hills and some steps.
  • Clearly signposted.
  • No experience required.
Class 3 walking trackGrade 3 track Australian Standards
  • Gently sloping, well-defined track with slight inclines or few steps
  • Caution needed on loose gravel surfaces and exposed natural lookouts
  • Average level of fitness and ankle-supporting footwear required.

Walking tracks

Class 2 walking trackYabba Creek circuit (Grade 2)
Distance:
730m
Time: Allow 20mins

Details: Beginning at the far end of Peach Trees camping area, this walk crosses a suspension bridge over Yabba Creek and follows the creek before crossing again into the camping area near the main entrance.

Sit quietly, especially around dusk and dawn, and look for platypus feeding in the creek.

Class 3 walking trackEugenia circuit (Grade 3)
Distance:
2.4km
Time: Allow 1hr

Details: This walk leads through open forest to a scenic creek lookout above Yabba Creek. Cross the creek on a timber bridge and meander back along the opposite bank. Lilly pilly trees and bottle brushes grow densely along the creek bank. Creek crossings can flood after heavy rain.

Class 3 walking trackAraucaria circuit (Grade 3)
Distance:
3.5km
Time: Allow 2hrs

Details: An extension of the Yabba Creek circuit, this walk features open forests of ironbark and grey gum; and dry rainforest with emergent bunya and hoop pines.

Mountain bike riding

Mountain bike riding is permitted on state forest roads and vehicle tracks unless otherwise signed.

Bike riders are not permitted on designated walking tracks.

Read more about mountain bike riding in forest areas.

Horse riding

Horse riding is permitted on state forest roads and the Horse trail network. Horses are permitted overnight in the horse paddock beside Peach Trees camping area. Up to 20 horses can be accommodated in the horse paddock with the use of electric yards. Horse riders are required to bring and use their own electric tape to set up yards. Horses are not permitted in the camping areas.

Horses are not permitted on designated walking tracks.

Read about Horse riding in forest areas and the Horse trail networks in this region.

Things to know before you go

Essentials to bring

  • Plan your trip carefully, be self-sufficient and ensure your vehicle is in good condition.
  • Carry enough food, water, equipment and other supplies for your trip.
  • Pack a first-aid kit, sunscreen, insect repellent, sturdy shoes, hat and raincoat.
  • Rubbish bins are not provided. Remove excess packaging when you pack for your trip. Bring rubbish bags, and take all recyclables and rubbish with you when you leave.
  • Preferably bring and use fuel or gas stoves. If you do wish to use the fire rings provided, bring your own clean, milled firewood, as it is illegal to collect firewood from the forest.
  • Bring suitable clothing.Temperatures in the area soar above 30°C in summer and drop below 0°C in winter. Nights can be cool at any time of the year.

Opening hours

These parks and forests are open 24 hours every day.

Permits and fees

Camping permits are required to camp in forests or parks. Fees apply.

Pets

Horses may be ridden on roads and the Horse Trail Network in Jimna State Forest. Dogs are allowed on a lead in Jimna State Forest, but not in the camping area. Other domestic animals are not permitted.

Climate and weather

Temperatures in the area exceed 30°C in summer and drop below zero in winter. Nights can be cool at any time. For more information see the tourism information links below

Fuel and supplies

Fuel and supplies are available at Kenilworth and Kilcoy. For more information see the tourism information links below.

Staying safe

Waterways are not fenced. Always stay close to your children. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

Waterways are not fenced. Always stay close to your children. Photo: Ross Naumann, QPWS volunteer.

Drive safely

  • Slow down—allow time to react to unexpected situations and changed conditions. You share the road with other drivers, logging trucks, cyclists, walkers, horse riders and wildlife.
  • Be courteous—pull over to the left to allow vehicles to pass. For photography and enjoying the scenery, find a safe place to pull over or turn around. Do not stop in the roadway.
  • Watch out for corners—stay on your side of the road. Avoid sudden slowing as the vehicle may slide.
  • Take extra care on steep and wet roads—shift down a gear. When creek water is across the road, check water depth and road surface before crossing.
  • Obey road signs—speed limits apply.
  • Vehicle access is not possible in some areas. Look out for signs that indicate accessibility.

Flood warning!

  • Heavy rain can flood creek crossings—sometimes suddenly.
  • Safety is your responsibility.

For your safety please observe the following:

  • Obey all road closures—roads may be closed due to deep water levels at creek crossings or wet and slippery conditions.
  • Flood waters in this area rise and fall quickly and are a hazard to life and property.
  • Avoid flooded crossings. Submerged obstacles may pose a hazard. Traffic ahead may have created hidden hazards, such as deep holes. Cross at your own risk. If in doubt, wait it out!
  • Always check road conditions and weather forecasts before travelling. For road conditions please visit the Department of Transport and Main Roads website.

For weather forecasts visit the Bureau of Meteorology website.

Stay on track

Tell a responsible person where you are going and when you should return. Wear sturdy shoes. Carry adequate clothing, water and energy snack food.

Supervise children

Stay with your children. They may be unfamiliar with hazards in natural areas—creeks, cliff edges, stinging plants and defensive wildlife.

Human food is not for wildlife

Feeding wildlife is an offence and it can cause overpopulation, illness and aggressive behaviour in animals.

Water hazards

  • Never dive into creeks or rock pools, as they contain submerged rocks and logs.
  • Water depth is unpredictable.
  • Rock surfaces can be slippery.
  • Always supervise children around water.

Carry a first-aid kit

  • Carry a well-equipped first-aid kit and know how to use first aid.
  • Insect repellent on exposed skin and shoes to discourage mosquitoes, leeches and ticks is recommended.
  • Check for ticks often and remove them immediately.

Treat all water

Boil water for at least five minutes to kill most pathogens or use water treatment tablets. Tap water is pumped from the creek and bore and may contain organisms that can cause illness.

Take care with fire

  • Please only use the fire rings provided.
  • Never leave a fire unattended.
  • Ensure the fire is completely out before you leave.
  • Use water, not dirt, to extinguish campfires.
  • Preferably bring a fuel stove.

Be aware! During fire bans or prohibitions no fires are allowed. Check park alerts before heading off to camp.

In an emergency

In case of accident or other emergency please:

  • call Triple Zero (000)
  • call 106 for a text-only message for deaf or speech or hearing impaired callers
  • advise your location and nature of the emergency
  • stay on the phone until you are told to hang up.

The nearest hospitals are located at Kilcoy, Caboolture, Maleny and Nanango.

Looking after the park

Suspension bridge over Yabba Creek helps to keep visitor impact to a minimum. Photo: Queensland Government.

Suspension bridge over Yabba Creek helps to keep visitor impact to a minimum. Photo: Queensland Government.

Minimal impact recreation

Help protect our natural resources by minimising your impact.

  • Take all your rubbish out of the park and dispose of it responsibly.
  • Remove excess packaging at home, before your visit to the forest.
  • Pack strong sealable bags or containers to store food and rubbish.

Catchment care

The creek beside this camping and picnic area feeds water into Lake Borumba and the Mary River and on to domestic water supplies. Please keep these headwaters clean.

See Caring for parks and forests for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks.

Park management

The Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) manages this forest under the Forestry Act 1959, except for plantation areas.

Tourism information links

For more information about activities, tours and accommodation in this region, contact:

Kilcoy Information Centre
www.somersettourism.com.au
41 Hope Street, Kilcoy QLD 4515
ph (07) 5422 0440
email

Kenilworth Information Centre
Elizabeth Street, Kenilworth QLD 4574
ph (07) 5446 0122
email

Maleny Visitor Information Centre
www.hinterlandtourism.com.au
Maple Street, Maleny QLD 4552
ph (07) 5499 9033
fax (07) 5499 9033
email

Visit Sunshine Coast
www.scdl.com.au

Visit Sunshine Coast has eight accredited Visitor Information Centres across the Sunshine Coast that provide a range of local and regional tourist brochures and information, as well as a tour, attraction and accommodation booking service.

  • 7 Caloundra Road, Caloundra
  • 77 Bulcock Street, Caloundra
  • Bruce Parade, corner of Reed Street, Settler's Rotary Park, Glass House Mountains
  • 198 Main Road, Montville
  • Melrose Parade, corner of Sixth Avenue, Maroochydore
  • Brisbane Road, corner of First Ave, Mooloolaba
  • Tickle Park, David Low Way, Coolum Beach
  • Friendship Drive, Mudjimba

ph 1300 847 481 (within Australia)
email

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see Queensland Holidays.

Further information

Contact us

Last updated
14 August 2017