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About Imbil

Getting there and getting around

Floodwaters can cut roads in Imbil State Forest. If in doubt wait it out. Photo: Queensland Government

Floodwaters can cut roads in Imbil State Forest. If in doubt wait it out. Photo: Queensland Government

From Brisbane, follow the Bruce Highway north, take the Landsborough exit and travel to Maleny. Then travel along the Maleny Kenilworth Road and turn into Sunday Creek Road (13.5km north of Conondale township). The Charlie Moreland camping area is 5km along Sunday Creek Road.

Alternative access is via the Eumundi Kenilworth Road, off the Bruce Highway. Kenilworth is about 28km from the highway. The turnoff into Sunday Creek Road is about 7km past Kenilworth.

Between Maleny-Kenilworth Road junction and Charlie Moreland camping area, Sunday Creek Road is a gravel road that is suitable for conventional, two-wheel-drive vehicles, however caution is required during wet weather. Beyond Charlie Moreland camping and day-use area, Sunday Creek Road is suitable for high clearance four-wheel-drive vehicles and off-road motorbikes only.

When driving on forest roads—expect the unexpected

  • Slow down—allow time to react to unexpected situations and changed conditions. You share the road with other drivers, logging trucks, cyclists, walkers, horse riders and wildlife.
  • Be courteous—pull over to the left to allow vehicles to pass. For photography and enjoying the scenery, find a safe place to pull over or turn around. Do not stop on the roadway.
  • Watch out for corners—stay on your side of the road. Avoid sudden slowing as the vehicle may slide.
  • Take extra care on steep and wet roads—shift down a gear.
  • When creek water is across the road, check water depth and road surface before crossing. Water usually covers the Booloumba Creek crossings.
  • Obey road signs—speed limits apply.

Warning! Heavy rain can flood creek crossings.

For your safety please observe the following:

  • Obey all road closures—roads may be closed due to deep water levels at creek crossings or wet and slippery conditions.
  • Flood waters in this area rise and fall quickly and are a hazard to life and property.
  • Avoid flooded crossings. Submerged obstacles may pose a hazard. Traffic ahead may have created hidden hazards, such as deep holes. Cross at your own risk. If in doubt, wait it out!

Always check road conditions and weather forecasts before travelling.

Wheelchair accessibility

A wheelchair-accessible toilet and camping site is located at Charlie Moreland camping area. Assistance is required when negotiating the grassed areas. The Fig Tree walk with wayside interpretive signs is wheelchair-accessible.

Park features

Adjoining Conondale National Park, this area provides easy access to the features of both Imbil State Forest and Conondale National Park—luxuriant rainforest, tall eucalypt forest, mosaics of plantation forest, waterfalls, boulder-strewn creeks and spectacular scenery make this area well worth a visit.

The diverse forests provide homes for a wonderful variety of wildlife including more than 120 species of birds and many mammals. The threatened and seldom-seen yellow-bellied glider lives in the open forest.

Camping and accommodation

Camping

The camping area facilities include toilets (some wheelchair accessible) and taps. Tap water is unsuitable for drinking without treatment.

Preferably bring a fuel stove. Barbecues and fire-rings are provided for cooking. Bring your own clean-cut firewood, as it is illegal to collect firewood from the forest. Generators are not permitted.

The camping area is in grassy open forest and has sites suitable for tents, large groups, campervans, caravans and camper trailers.

A large enclosed paddock is provided beside the camping area for horses. You are encouraged to bring your own temporary fencing.

Camping permits for all camp sites must be booked in advance, either online, over-the-counter or by phone.

Other accommodation

A range of holiday accommodation is available in the Sunshine Coast hinterland. For more information see the tourism information links below.

Things to do

Follow the give way code for cyclists, walkers and horseriders

Follow the give way code for cyclists, walkers and horseriders

The buttress roots of fig trees help support these tall rainforest giants seen along the Fig Tree circuit. Photo: Ross Naumann

The buttress roots of fig trees help support these tall rainforest giants seen along the Fig Tree circuit. Photo: Ross Naumann

Boardwalk creek crossing on Little Yabba Creek circuit. Photo: Ross Naumann

Boardwalk creek crossing on Little Yabba Creek circuit. Photo: Ross Naumann

Imbil State Forest offers a range of walking, horse riding and mountain bike riding opportunities.

Follow the give way code:

Be careful and courteous: walkers, horseriders and cyclists often share the same tracks.

  • Cyclists must give way to walkers and horseriders, and alert others when approaching them.
  • Walkers must give way to horses.

For more information, read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

Walking

From gentle strolls to challenging hikes, a range of walking opportunities are provided. Refer to the walking track grade when choosing walks suitable for your ability and fitness level.

Walking track classifications

Grade 1

Flat, well-formed track, no steps, 5km or less. Clearly signposted. Suitable for wheelchairs with assistance.

Grade 3

Formed track, some obstacles, 20km or less. May have short steep hills and many steps. Some experience recommended.

Grade 4

Rough track. May be long and very steep with few directional signs. For experienced bushwalkers.

Fig Tree walk—780m circuit (allow 45mins) Grade 1

This short circuit walk leads through magnificent rainforest. Watch out for large stinging tree leaves—look but don’t touch! The circuit is suitable for wheelchair access.

Little Yabba circuit—1.5km return (allow 45mins) Grade 3

Wade across Little Yabba Creek to explore hoop pine plantation and riparian rainforest. This is a good birdwatching area.

Piccabeen circuit—3.5km return (allow 2hrs) Grade 3

An extension of the Little Yabba circuit, this walk explores hoop pine plantation, riparian rainforest and a piccabeen palm grove.

Mount Allan shared trail—8.8km return (allow 4hrs) Grade 4

From Charlie Moreland, follow a steep shared trail through hoop pine plantation towards Mount Allan in Conondale National Park.

Watch out for horse and mountain bike riders—follow the give way code.

Management and logging vehicles use this route—if you hear a vehicle approaching, immediately move off to the side of the trail.

At the hitching rail, ascend the 300m walking track to the top of Mount Allan. Climb the stairs of the 9.6m high fire tower for splendid 360 degree views of the surrounding ranges.

Riders must dismount and leave horses/bikes at the hitching rail before walking to the fire tower.

Horse and mountain bike riding

Nature-based recreation opportunities are available in this area for horse and mountain bike riders.

Horse riding is permitted on shared trails and roads in State forests. Horse riding is restricted in national parks—use designated shared trails only.

Mountain bike riding is permitted in the same areas and on vehicle tracks unless otherwise signed.

Horses and bikes are not permitted on designated walking tracks.

Horses are permitted overnight in a large enclosed paddock beside Charlie Moreland camping area. They are not permitted in the camping areas.

A special permit is not required unless it is a commercial activity, an organised group activity or a competitive event.

Read about the Horse Trail Network in this region.

Day-use areas

Picnic facilities are provided beside Little Yabba Creek. Facilities include wood and gas barbecues, picnic tables, toilets and tap water (unsuitable for drinking without treatment).

Bring your own fuel stove or clean-cut firewood—it is illegal to collect firewood from the forest.

Things to know before you go

Pack strong containers to store and protect your food and rubbish from foraging wildlife, including goannas. Human food is harmful to wildlife! Photo: Ross Naumann

Pack strong containers to store and protect your food and rubbish from foraging wildlife, including goannas. Human food is harmful to wildlife! Photo: Ross Naumann

Kookaburras can become pests if fed. Photo: Ross Naumann

Kookaburras can become pests if fed. Photo: Ross Naumann

Essentials to bring

  • Plan your trip carefully, be self-sufficient and ensure your vehicle is in good condition.
  • Carry enough food, water, equipment and other supplies for your trip.
  • Pack a first-aid kit, sunscreen, insect repellent, sturdy shoes, hat and raincoat.
  • Bring suitable clothing. Temperatures in the area soar above 30°C in summer and drop below 0°C in winter. Nights can be cool at any time of the year.
  • Rubbish bins are not provided. Remove excess packaging when you pack for your trip. Bring rubbish bags and take all recyclables and rubbish with you when you leave.
  • Preferably bring and use fuel or gas stoves. If you do wish to use the barbecues provided, bring your own clean-cut firewood, as it is illegal to collect firewood from the forest.

Opening hours

These parks and forests are open 24 hours a day. There is a pay phone outside the Kenilworth QPWS office on Sunday Creek Road.

Permits and fees

A permit is required if camping in forests or parks. Fees apply.

Pets

Horse riding is permitted on shared trails and roads in State forests. A large enclosed paddock is provided beside the camping area for horses. Horses and other domestic animals are not permitted within the camping or day-use area.

Climate and weather

Temperatures in the area exceed 30°C in summer and drop below 0°C in winter. Nights can be cool at any time of the year. For more information see the tourism information links below

Fuel and supplies

Fuel and supplies are available at Kenilworth, Conondale and Maleny. For more information see the tourism information links below.

Staying safe

Drive safely

  • Registered motorised vehicles—including trail bikes—are permitted to traverse forest roads, unless otherwise signposted.
  • High clearance four-wheel-drive vehicles and off-road motorbikes are recommended.
  • Queensland road rules apply.
  • Avoid driving in or immediately after wet weather.
  • Slow down—allow time to react to unexpected situations and changed conditions. You share the road with other drivers, logging trucks, cyclists, walkers, horse riders and wildlife.
  • Be courteous—pull over to the left to allow vehicles to pass. For photography and enjoying the scenery, find a safe place to pull over or turn around. Do not stop on the roadway.
  • Watch out for corners—stay on your side of the road. Avoid sudden slowing as the vehicle may slide.
  • Take extra care on steep and wet roads—shift down a gear.
  • When creek water is across the road, check water depth and road surface before crossing. Water usually covers the Booloumba Creek crossings.

Warning! Heavy rain can flood creek crossings.

For your safety please observe the following:

  • Obey all road closures—roads may be closed due to deep water levels at creek crossings or wet and slippery conditions.
  • Flood waters in this area rise and fall quickly and are a hazard to life and property.
  • Avoid flooded crossings. Submerged obstacles may pose a hazard. Traffic ahead may have created hidden hazards, such as deep holes. Cross at your own risk. If in doubt, wait it out!

Always check road conditions and weather forecasts before travelling.

Stay on track

Tell a responsible person where you are going and when you expect to return. Wear sturdy shoes. Carry adequate clothing, water and snack food.

Supervise children

Natural areas have hazards with which children are unfamiliar: creeks, cliff edges, stinging plants and defensive wildlife.

Human food is not for wildlife

Feeding wildlife is an offence and it can cause overpopulation, illness and aggressive behaviour in animals.

Water hazards

  • Never dive into creeks or rock pools, as they contain submerged rocks and logs.
  • Water depth is unpredictable.
  • Rock surfaces can be slippery.
  • Always supervise children around water.
  • Crossing or swimming in creeks—if it’s flooded, forget it!

Carry a first-aid kit

  • Carry a well-equipped first-aid kit and know how to use it.
  • Insect repellent is recommended to discourage mosquitoes, leeches and ticks.
  • Check for ticks often and remove them immediately.

Treat all water

Boil water for approximately five minutes to kill most pathogens or use water treatment tablets. Tap water is pumped from the creek and may contain organisms that cause illness.

Take care with fire

  • Only use constructed fireplaces.
  • Never leave a fire unattended.
  • Always supervise children around campfires.
  • Ensure the fire is completely out before you leave.
  • Use water, not dirt, to extinguish campfires.
  • Preferably bring a fuel stove.

Be aware! During fire bans or prohibitions no fires are allowed. Check park alerts before heading off to camp.

In an emergency

  • Phone Triple Zero (000) for all life threatening, critical or serious emergencies, or for reporting a bushfire or acts of arson. If you have difficulty connecting to Triple Zero (000) from a mobile phone, try dialling 112.

For more information about staying safe while visiting national parks, please read the guidelines Safety in parks and forests.

Looking after the park

Help protect our natural environment by practicing minimal impact recreation. Take all your rubbish out of the park. Remove excess food packaging at home, before your visit to the forest, and pack strong sealable bags or containers to store food and rubbish.

Creeks near camping and picnic areas feed water into the Mary River and on to domestic water supplies. Please keep them clean.

See Caring for parks and forests for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks.

Park management

The Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) manages these parks and forests under the Nature Conservation Act 1992 and Forestry Act 1959.

Tourism information links

For more information about activities, tours and accommodation in this region contact:

Kenilworth Information Centre
Elizabeth Street, Kenilworth Q 4574
ph (07) 5446 0122
email

Visit Sunshine Coast
www.visitsunshinecoast.com
ph 1300 847 481 (within Australia)
email

Visit Sunshine Coast manages accredited Visitor Information Centres across the Sunshine Coast that provide a range of local and regional tourist brochures and information, as well as a tour, attraction and accommodation booking service.

  • 198 Main Road, Montville
  • Settler's Rotary Park, Bruce Parade, corner of Reed Street, Glass House Mountains
  • 7 Caloundra Road, Caloundra
  • 77 Bulcock Street, Caloundra
  • Cnr Melrose Parade and Sixth Avenue, Cotton Tree (Maroochydore)
  • Cnr First Ave and Brisbane Rd, Mooloolaba
  • Tickle Park, David Low Way, Coolum Beach
  • Arrivals Terminal, Sunshine Coast Airport, Friendship Drive, Mudjimba

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see Queensland.com

Further information

Contact us

Last updated
28 October 2016