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About Good Night Scrub National Park

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Getting there and getting around

One Tree Hill 4WD access road. Take care on the unsealed roads. Photo: Cathy Gatley, Queensland Government.

One Tree Hill 4WD access road. Take care on the unsealed roads. Photo: Cathy Gatley, Queensland Government.

Good Night Scrub is in the Burnett Valley between Gin Gin and Gayndah.

Unsealed gravel roads may suit conventional vehicles in dry conditions. Other gravel roads are only suitable for four-wheel-drive vehicles (4WD’s), including the access to One Tree Hill lookout (limited views through vegetation).

In wet conditions, gravel roads become very slippery and may be impassible to all vehicles—including 4WD’s—with boggy and eroded sections of track likely to occur.

Be aware that main access roads to the National Park can flood after storms and prolonged periods of rain. Check road closures and park alerts before arrival.

Access from the south (Maryborough/Sunshine Coast/Brisbane): Approximately 27km west of Childers, take the Booyal-Dallarnil Road turn-off on the left side of the Bruce Highway. After 300m, turn right onto Causeway Road. After 4km, cross the Burnett River causeway then travel another 7km to the junction of Goodnight Road. Turn left onto the gravel road section of Goodnight Road and travel another 10km to reach the entrance of the national park.

Access from the north (Gladstone/Bundaberg): Approximately 14km south of the township of Gin Gin and before the Burnett River bridge, take the Mittlehausers Road turn-off on the right side of the Bruce Highway. Then immediately turn left onto Walla Road. After 6km, this road forms into Mingo Road and then travels another 3km to the junction of Goodnight Road. Turn left and follow Goodnight Road for 5km to the junction with Causeway Road. Turn right onto the gravel road section of Goodnight Road and travel another 10km to reach the entrance of the national park.

View Good Night Scrub National Park map (PDF, 217K) for internal access roads from the entrance of the National Park.

Park features

Hoop pine rainforests provide a wildlife haven. Photo: Carl Moller, Queensland Government Volunteer.

Hoop pine rainforests provide a wildlife haven. Photo: Carl Moller, Queensland Government Volunteer.

In hilly country in the Burnett Valley, Good Night Scrub National Park protects an intact remnant of once extensive hoop pine rainforest. Most of this 6680ha park is dry vine scrub and vine thicket with tall hoop pines emerging above the forest. Distinctive bottle trees and crows ash are also common. The rest of the park is dry open forest featuring spotted gum, forest red gum and narrow-leaved red ironbark.

According to local folklore, the scrub was so thick that people could not walk or ride through it. If cattle escaped into the scrub, you could “kiss your cattle goodnight”.

Good Night Scrub has a long history of logging, both hard and softwood, stretching back to the early 1900s. The history of logging included timber workers living on the park and a well established Forestry Office with workshop and accommodation set up at the base of One Tree Hill.

Good Night Scrub is the last known sighting of the presumed extinct paradise parrot. Part of the park was flooded by the construction of Paradise Dam on the Burnett River in 2005.

Camping and accommodation

Camping

Camping is not permitted in Good Night Scrub National Park.

Other Accommodation

Camping is available at Paradise Dam. It is managed by the North Burnett Regional Council. Other accommodation options can be found at Mount Perry and Biggenden.

For more information see the tourism information link below.

Things to do

There are limited views through vegetation at One Tree Hill lookout. Photo: John Gatley, Queensland Government Volunteer.

There are limited views through vegetation at One Tree Hill lookout. Photo: John Gatley, Queensland Government Volunteer.

Stop for a picnic when exploring the park. Photo: John Gatley, Queensland Government Volunteer.

Stop for a picnic when exploring the park. Photo: John Gatley, Queensland Government Volunteer.

Exploring Good Night Scrub

Enjoy nature in this peaceful retreat. Have a picnic in a picturesque bushland setting overlooking the Paradise Dam spillway. A picnic table is provided here.

Go birdwatching—more than 166 species have been seen in the park, including powerful owls, regent bowerbirds, forest kingfishers and king parrots. See swans, spoonbills and other waterbirds along the river. Discover wildlife watching. See black-striped, swamp and red-necked wallabies. More than 60 species of butterflies have been seen in the park.

Enjoy limited views from One Tree Hill lookout. Access to the lookout is only possible in dry conditions in a four-wheel-drive vehicle.

Walking

While no formal walking tracks are provided you can walk along an extensive network of firetrails. Make sure you carry a mobile phone and water. Wear a hat, sunscreen, insect repellent and a long-sleeve shirt to protect you from the elements.

Other activities

Boating, fishing and barbecues are popular activities at the nearby Paradise Dam recreation area managed by the North Burnett Regional Council.

Things to know before you go

Enjoy birdwatching throughout the park. Photo: Cathy Gatley, Queensland Government.

Enjoy birdwatching throughout the park. Photo: Cathy Gatley, Queensland Government.

Essentials to bring

  • Plan your trip carefully, be self-sufficient and ensure your vehicle is in good condition.
  • Carry enough food, and drinking water for your trip.
  • Pack a first-aid kit, sunscreen, insect repellent, sturdy shoes, hat and raincoat.
  • Rubbish bins are not provided. Remove excess packaging when you pack for your trip. Take all recyclables and rubbish with you when you leave.

Opening hours

Good Night Scrub National Park is open 24 hours a day.

Pets

Domestic animals are not permitted in the Good Night Scrub National Park.

Climate and weather

The North Burnett area has a climate that is sub-tropical and sub-humid with rainfall tending to be more concentrated in the months from October to March. Frosts can occur throughout the region, mainly in June to August.

Average temperatures range from 5°C to 32°C, however temperatures as high as 40°C can be experienced over short periods during the summer months.

Fuel and supplies

Fuel and supplies are available at Gin Gin and Childers townships.

For more information see the tourism information link below.

Staying safe

Walking wisely

  • Choose walks that suit the capabilities of your entire group.
  • Wear a hat, sunscreen, insect repellent, comfortable clothes and sturdy shoes with good grip.
  • Plan your walk to avoid walking in the middle of the day during hotter months.
  • Leave a copy of your bushwalking plans with a friend, relative or other reliable person. Remember to let them know when you have returned. See more about walking safely.
  • Stay together and on designated trails. Always supervise children.
  • Take a basic first-aid kit and mobile phone.
  • Always carry drinking water.
  • Remain a safe distance from dam walls and outlet structures and stay in designated recreational areas.

Fire Safety

Wildfires are a threat to walkers, campers and the forest community. They can occur without warning, so be aware and prepared for the dangers.

If a bushfire occurs while you are out walking:

  • Follow the trail away from the fire to the nearest road or creek for refuge.
  • Large logs, a ditch or burnt ground can also provide protection.
  • Avoid areas of heavy fuel, such as deep leaf litter, and stay low to the ground where the air is coolest and contains the least smoke.
  • In high fire danger conditions, trails and other areas may be closed. It is essential for your safety to follow the instructions on signs in these conditions.

If you see a bushfire, please alert a ranger or the police as soon as possible.

In an emergency

In case of accident or other emergency please:

  • call Triple Zero (000)
  • advise the location and nature of the emergency
  • stay on the phone until you are told to hang up.

The nearest hospitals are Childers Hospital, Gin Gin Hospital and Mt Perry Health Centre.

Mobile phone coverage is not reliable in Good Night Scrub National Park.

For more information, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

Looking after the park

The distinctive bottle tree. Photo: Cathy Gatley, Queensland Government.

The distinctive bottle tree. Photo: Cathy Gatley, Queensland Government.

Remember, everything in the park (living or dead) is protected. Do not interfere with plants, animals, soil or rocks. Help care for the Good Night Scrub National Park by:

  • Storing food away from foraging wildlife and not feeding wildlife—human food can harm wildlife and cause some animals to become aggressive.
  • Taking your rubbish away for appropriate disposal—do not bury rubbish in the park.
  • Ensure you dig a pit toilet at least 50cm deep and 100m from water courses and tracks.
  • Not using soaps in the waterways to prevent pollution.
  • Avoid driving on firetrails and lesser tracks in wet conditions as this can cause considerable damage to them.

See the guidelines on caring for parks for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks.
 

Park management

Good Night Scrub was first gazetted as a National Park in 1998 and is managed by Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) under the Nature Conservation Act 1992.

Tourism information links

Bundaberg West Visitor Information Centre
http://www.bundabergregion.org  
271 Bourbong Street, Bundaberg
PO Box 930, Bundaberg QLD 4670
ph (07) 4153 8888
fax (07) 4151 2527
email  

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see Queensland Holidays.

Further information

Contact us

Last updated
5 September 2017