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Trail-bike riding

National parks and forests are great places for scenic, recreational trail-bike riding. Photo courtesy of Andrew Lowe.

National parks and forests are great places for scenic, recreational trail-bike riding. Photo courtesy of Andrew Lowe.

Trail-bike riding is an increasingly popular, fun and adventurous way to enjoy the outdoors. National parks and forests are great locations for scenic, recreational trail-bike riding. They provide thousands of kilometres of roads to ride on right around the State.

Where can I ride my trail bike?

Queensland's parks and forests have trail-bike riding opportunities for every licensed rider with a fully registered bike. Photo courtesy of Andrew Lowe.

Queensland's parks and forests have trail-bike riding opportunities for every licensed rider with a fully registered bike. Photo courtesy of Andrew Lowe.

If you have a valid motorbike licence and your bike is fully registered then you can ride on any public access road.

There are some great trail-bike riding opportunities in Queensland’s parks and forests. You can search for parks and forests with trail-bike riding opportunities or check out this list for some of the best.

You can also find out about the best places to ride by visiting the Queensland Government trail bike-riding web page.

Please note:

  • Unlicensed riders are not allowed in parks and forests. Riders must be licensed and bikes must be fully registered, conditionally registered bikes are not allowed.
  • Signs may prohibit or regulate riding on roads in parts of the parks or forests.
  • Other vehicles—including logging trucks, four-wheel drives, mountain bikes—and horseriders also use many of the roads.
  • Off road riding isn’t allowed.
  • Motocross is not permitted in parks and forests.

Do I need a permit?

You are only required to obtain a permit if you are involved in an organised event, a competitive event or a commercial activity. Contact the environmental licences and permits team for further information.

Ride responsibly

  • Don’t ride if you don’t have a licence.
  • Don’t ride if your bike isn’t fully registered—conditionally registered bikes for recreational use are not allowed.
  • Stay on roads and defined trail-bike tracks—off-road riding is not allowed.
  • Obey speed limits.
  • Ride within your skill level.
  • Observe and obey safety and advisory signs.
  • Avoid spinning your rear tyre excessively as this leads to erosion problems.
  • Wash your bike thoroughly before and after trips to prevent the spread of weeds.
  • Respect park neighbours and other visitors—make sure the noise and dust from your riding doesn’t upset other people.

Penalties for doing the wrong thing can include fines and having your bike confiscated. So ride smart, ride safe and ride in the right place!

Ride safely

Make sure you have the right protective gear before setting out on your ride. Photo courtesy of Andrew Lowe.

Make sure you have the right protective gear before setting out on your ride. Photo courtesy of Andrew Lowe.

Serious accidents involving trail bikes have occurred in national parks and forests. Accidents can be avoided by following road rules and riding safely. Normal road rules apply when riding on roads in national parks, regional parks and forests. Riders need to be prepared for difficulties that could be encountered in remote areas and in rough terrain.

Follow these tips for riding safely.

Before you leave

  • Make sure you have the right protective gear which can include helmet, gloves, jacket, boots, body armour and goggles.
  • Make sure your bike is in good working order before you travel.
  • Plan your trip.
  • Before you leave home check park alerts for the latest information on access, closures and conditions.
  • Check current weather conditions before you travel at the Bureau of Meteorology website and road conditions at the Queensland Government's traffic and travel information website.
  • Let a responsible person know of your travel plans; where you’re going and how long you’ll be.
  • If possible, ride with another vehicle if you are going to remote places.

Watch out for wildlife, pedestrians and other road users

  • Ride carefully to allow time to react to sudden or unexpected problems.
  • Always expect to find someone or something on the road around the next corner. You may encounter other trail-bike riders, horseriders, cyclists, vehicles, wildlife, cattle and natural obstacles such as fallen trees and water-eroded tracks.
  • Watch out for, and give way to, walkers, cyclists and horseriders.

Take extra care during and after wet weather

  • Watch out for washouts, scoured road shoulders and loose surfaces.
  • Be especially careful in wet weather. Some roads become impassable, even to trail bikes!

Avoid driving on roads (especially unsealed roads) during and after heavy rain. Driving on wet roads causes damage to the road surface.

Essentials to bring

  • Maps and guidebooks.
  • First-aid kit.
  • Adequate drinking water.
  • Tyre pressure gauge and a pump to reinflate tyres.
  • Sufficient fuel (and be aware of where you can refuel).
  • Carry at least one form of communication equipment. Satellite phones and EPIRBs are the most effective, as mobile phone coverage can be unreliable.

Useful links

Further information

Before you leave home, check park alerts for the latest information on access, closures and conditions.

Last updated
1 August 2012