Skip links and keyboard navigation

Gondwana Rainforests of Australia

Looking towards Main Range from Lamington National Park. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government.

Looking towards Main Range from Lamington National Park. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government.

The Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area, originally listed in 1986 to cover rainforests in New South Wales, was extended in 1994 to include rainforests on the Queensland side of the border.

The masked mountain frog Kyarranus loveridgei is one example of the rich diversity of ancient frogs found in the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area. Photo: Harry Hines, Queensland Government.

The masked mountain frog Kyarranus loveridgei is one example of the rich diversity of ancient frogs found in the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area. Photo: Harry Hines, Queensland Government.

The property is recognised as World Heritage as it tells us so much about the development of our landscape, plants and animals. It contains rainforests similar to those that once covered the ancient supercontinent of Gondwana but have contracted to these isolated pockets on the east coast. Containing a fascinating diversity of plants and animals, these rainforests are biodiversity hot-spots with species from ancient times as well as those recently evolved.

This property has an area of 366 507ha; 59 223ha is in Queensland including Lamington, Springbrook, Mount Barney and Main Range national parks. An estimated 2 million people a year visit this World Heritage area.

The Gondwana Rainforests protects many rainforests including warm temperate, cool temperate, subtropical and dry rainforests. The property contains the world's most extensive subtropical rainforest and nearly all of the world's Antarctic beech cool temperate rainforest.

Rainforests on both sides of the border contain more frog, snake, bird and marsupial species than anywhere else in Australia. This property provides a home for many rare and threatened plants and animals and ancient life forms.

Sub-tropical rainforest in Lamington and Main Range national parks provides a home for ground-dwelling birds such as the rare Albert's lyrebird and the endangered eastern bristlebird. While the subtropical rainforest and wet sclerophyll forests of Mount Barney National Park provide critical habitat for the vulnerable plumed frogmouth.

The New South Wales and Queensland Governments work together to protect this property. There are 28 reserves in New South Wales and five in Queensland. Read more about the New South Wales properties.

Read more about Gondwana Rainforests of Australia.

Last updated
25 October 2016